The Analytics PAIN Part 3: How to Interpret P-Values with Linear Regression

You may find Part 1 and Part 2 interesting before heading into part 3, below.

p-value-statistics-meme

Interpreting Statistical Output and P-Values

To recap, you own Pearson’s Pizza and you’ve hired your nephew Lloyd to run the establishment. And since Lloyd is not much of a math whiz, you’ve decided to help him learn some statistics based on pizza prices.

When we left off, you and Lloyd realized that, despite a strong correlation and high R-Squared value, the residual plot suggests that predicting pizza prices from toppings will become less and less accurate as the number of toppings increase:

Shiny Residual Plot 2
A clear, distinct pattern in a residual plot is a red flag

Looking back at the original scatterplot and software output, Lloyd protests, “But the p-value is significant. It’s less than 0.0001.”

hold my beer
watch this

 

pizza4
The original software output. What does it all mean?

 

Doesn’t a small p-value imply that our model is a go?

freddie

A crash course on hypothesis testing

In Pearson Pizza’s back room, you’ve got two pool tables and a couple of slot machines (which may or may not be legal). One day, a tall, serious man saunters in, slaps down 100 quid and challenges (in an British accent), “My name is Ronnie O’Sullivan. That’s right. THE. Ronnie O’Sullivan.”

You throw the name into the Google and find out the world’s best snooker player just challenged you to a game of pool.

Then something interesting happens. YOU win.

Suddenly, you wonder, is this guy really who he says he is?

Because the likelihood of you winning this pool challenge to THE Ronnie O’Sullivan is slim to none IF he is, indeed, THE Ronnie O’Sullivan (the world’s best snooker player).

Beating this guy is SIGNIFICANT in that it challenges the claim that he is who he claims he is:

You aren’t SUPPOSED to beat THE Ronnie O’Sullivan – you can’t even beat Lloyd.

But you did beat this guy, whoever he claims to be.

So, in the end, you decide this man was an impostor, NOT Ronnie O’Sullivan.

In this scenario:

The claim (or “null hypothesis”): “This man is Ronnie O’Sullivan” you have no reason to question him – you’ve never even heard of snooker

The alternative claim (or “alternative hypothesis”): “This man is NOT Ronnie O’Sullivan”

The p-value: The likelihood you beat the world’s best snooker player assuming he is, in fact, the real Ronnie O’Sullivan.

Therefore, the p-value is the likelihood an observed outcome (at least as extreme) would occur if the claim were true. A small p-value can cast doubt on the legitimacy of the claim – chances you could beat Ronnie O’Sullivan in a game of pool are slim to none so it is MORE likely he is not Ronnie O’Sullivan. Still puzzled? Here’s a clever video explanation.

Some mathy stuff to consider

The intention of this post is to tie the meaning of this p-value to your decision, in the simplest terms I can find. I am leaving out a great deal of theory behind the sampling distribution of the regression coefficients – but I would be happy to explain it offline. What you do need to understand, however, is your data set is just a sample, a subset, from an unknown population. The p-value output is based on your observed sample statistics in this one particular sample while the variation is tied to a distribution of all possible samples of the same size (a theoretical model). Another sample would indeed produce a different outcome, and therefore a different p-value.

The hypothesis our software is testing

The output below gives a great deal of insight into the regression model used on the pizza data. The statistic du jour for the linear model is the p-value you always see in a Tableau regression output: The p-value testing the SLOPE of the line.

Therefore, a significant or insignificant p-value is tied to the SLOPE of your model.

Recall, the slope of the line tells you how much the pizza price changes for every topping ordered. Slope is a reflection of the relationship of the variables you’re studying. Before you continue reading, you explain to Lloyd that a slope of 0 means, “There is no relationship/association between the number of toppings and the price of the pizza.”

Tableau Regression Output

Zoom into that last little portion – and look at the numbers in red below:

Panes Line Coefficients
Row Column p-value DF Term Value StdErr t-value p-value
Pizza Price
Toppings
< 0.0001
19
Toppings
1.25
0.0993399
12.5831
< 0.0001
intercept
15
0.362738
41.3521
< 0.0001

In this scenario:

The claim: “There is no association between number of toppings ordered and the price of the pizza.” Or, the slope is zero (0).

The alternative claim: “There is an association between the number of toppings ordered and the price of the pizza.” In this case, the slope is not zero.* 

The p-value = Assuming there is no relationship between number of toppings and price of pizza, the likelihood of obtaining a slope of  at least $1.25 per topping is less than .01%.

The p-value is very small** — A slope of at least $1.25 would happen only .01% of the time just by chance. This small p-value means you have evidence of a relationship between number of toppings and the price of a pizza.

What the P-Value is NOT

  • The p-value is not the probability the null hypothesis is false – it is not the likelihood of a relationship between number of toppings and the price of pizza.
  • The p-value is not evidence we have a good linear model – remember, it’s only testing a relationship between the two variables (slope) based on one sample.
  • A high p-value does not necessarily mean there is no relationship between pizza price and number of toppings – when dealing in samples, chance variability (differences) and bias is present, leading to erroneous conclusions.
  • A statistically significant p-value does not necessarily mean the slope of the population data is not 0 – see the last bullet point. By chance, your sample data may be “off” from the full population data.

The P-Value is Not a Green Light

archer

The p-value here gives evidence of a relationship between the number of toppings ordered and the price of the pizza – which was already determined in part 1. (If you want to get technical, the correlation coefficient R is used in the formula to calculate slope.)

Applying a regression line for prediction requires the examination of all parts of the model. The p-value given merely reflects a significant slope — recall there is additional error (residuals) to consider and outside variables acting on one or both of the variables.

Ultimately, Pearson’s Pizza CAN apply the linear model to predict pizza prices from number of toppings. But only within reason. You decide not to predict for pizza prices when more than 5 toppings are chosen because, based on the residual plot, the prediction error is too great and the variation may ultimately hurt long-term budget predictions.

In a real business use case, the p-value, R-Squared, and residual plots can only aid in logical decision-making. Lloyd now realizes, thanks to your expertise, that using data output just to say he’s “data-driven” without proper attention to detail and common sense is unwise.

Statistical methods can be powerful tools for uncovering significant conclusions; however, with great power comes great responsibility.

p_values
Note: This cartoon uses sarcasm to poke fun at blindly following p-values.

—Anna Foard is a Business Development Consultant at Velocity Group

 

*Note this is an automatic 2-tailed test. Technically it is testing for a slope at least $1.25 AND at most -$1.25. For a 1-tailed test (looking only for greater than $1.25, for example) divide the p-value output by 2. For more information on the t-value, df, and standard error I’ve included additional notes and links at the bottom of this post.

**How small is small? Depends on the nature of what you are testing and your tolerance for “false negatives” or “false positives”. It is generally accepted practice in social sciences to consider a p-value small if it is under 0.05, meaning an observation at least as extreme would occur 5% of the time by chance if the claim were true. 

More information on t-value, df:

For those curious about the t-value, this statistic is also called the “critical value” or “test statistic”. This value is like a z-score, but relies on the Student’s t-distribution. In other words, the t-value is a standardized value indicating how far a slope of “1.25” will fall from the hypothesized mean of 0, taking into account sample size and variation (standard error).

In t-tests for regression, degrees of freedom (df) is calculated by subtracting the number of parameters being estimated from the sample size. In this example, there are 21 – 2 degrees of freedom because we started with 21 independent points, and there are two parameters to estimate, slope and y-intercept. 

Degrees of freedom (df) represents the amount of independent information available. For this example, n = 21 because we had 21 pieces of independent information. But since we used one piece of information to calculate slope and another to calculate the y-intercept, there are now n – 2 or 19 pieces of information left to calculate the variation in the model, and therefore the appropriate t-value. 

The Analytics PAIN Part 2: Least-Squares Regression Lines and Residuals

Haven’t read Part One of this series? Click here.

The Context

You are the sole proprietor of Pearson’s Pizza, a local pizza shop. Out of nepotism and despite his weak math skills, you’ve hired your nephew Lloyd to run the joint. And because you want your business to succeed, you decide this is a good time to strengthen your stats knowledge while you teach Lloyd – after all,

“In learning you will teach, and in teaching you will learn.”

– Latin Proverb and Phil Collins

Your pizzas are priced as follows:

Cheese pizza (no toppings): $15

Additional toppings: $1/each for regular, $1.50 for premium

When we left off, you and Lloyd were exploring the relationship between the number of toppings to the pizza price using a sample of possible scenarios.

pizza scatter
The scatterplot of Pizza Price vs. Number of Toppings: As the number of toppings increase, price of the pizza increases.

The Purpose(s) of a “Regression” Line

When investigating data sets of two continuous, numerical variables, a scatterplot is the typical go-to graph of choice. (See Daniel Zvinca’s article for more on this, and other options.)

So. When do we throw in a “line of best fit”? The answer to that question may surprise you:

A “line of best” fit, a regression line, is used to: (1) assess the relationship between two continuous variables that may respond or interact with each other (2) predict the value of y based on the value of x.

In other words, a regression line may not add value to Lloyd’s visualization if it won’t help him predict pizza prices from the number of toppings ordered. 

pizza4

The equation: pizza price = 1.25*Toppings +15

Recall the slope of the line above says that for every additional topping ordered the price of the pizza will increase by $1.25.

In the last post you discussed some higher-order concepts with Lloyd, like the correlation coefficient (R) and R-Squared. Using the data above, you said, “89.3% of the variability (differences) in pizza prices can be explained by the number of toppings.” Which also means 10.7% of the variability can be explained by other variables, in this case the two types of toppings.

Since there is a high R-Squared value, does Pearson’s Pizza have a solid model for prediction purposes? Before you answer, consider the logic behind “least-squares regression.”

Least-Squares Regression

You and Lloyd now understand that “trend lines”, “lines-of-best-fit”, and “regression lines” are all different ways of saying, “prediction lines.”

The least-squares regression line, the most common type of prediction line, uses regression to minimize the sum of the squared vertical distances from each observation (each point) to the regression line. These vertical distances, called residuals, are found simply by subtracting the predicted pizza price from the actual pizza price for each observed pizza purchase.

The magnitude of each residual indicates how much you’ve over- or under- predicted the pizza price, or prediction error.

Note the green lines in the plot below:

Residuals
The residuals, or vertical distances, are shown here in green. (Created in Shiny)

Lloyd learns about residuals

Recall, the least-squares regression equation:

pizza price = 1.25(toppings) + 15

Lloyd says he can predict the price of a pizza with 12 toppings:

pizza price =1.25*12 + 15

pizza price = $30

Sure, it’s easy to take the model and run with it. But what if the customer ordered 12 PREMIUM toppings? Logic says that’s (1.50)*12 + 15 = $33.

You explain to Lloyd that the residual here is 33 – 30, or $3. When a customer orders a pizza with 12 premium toppings, the model UNDER predicts the price of the pizza by $3. 

lloyd christmas

How valuable is THIS model for prediction purposes? Answer: It depends how much error is acceptable to your business and to your customer. 

Why the Residuals Matter

To determine if a linear model is appropriate, protocol* says to create a residual plot and check the graph of residuals. That is, graph all x-values (# of toppings) against the residuals and look for any obvious patterns. Create a residual plot with your own data here.

Ideally, the graph will show a cloud of points with no pattern. Patterns in residual plots suggest a linear model may NOT be suitable for prediction purposes.

Shiny Residual Plot 2
I spy a pattern. Or, how I bubbled my answers in Sociology class.

You notice from the residual plot above, as the number of toppings increase, the residuals increase. You realize the prediction error increases as we predict for more toppings. For Pearson’s Pizza, the least-squares regression line may not be very helpful for predicting price from toppings as the number of toppings increases.

Is a residual plot necessary? Not always. The residual plot merely “zooms in” on the pattern surrounding the prediction line. Becoming more aware of residuals and the part they play in determining model fit helps you look for these patterns in the original plots. In larger data sets with more variability, however, patterns may be difficult to find.

Lloyd says, “But the p-value is significant. It’s < 0.0001. Why look at the visualization of the residual plot when the p-value is so low?”

Is Lloyd correct?! Find out in Part 3 of this series.

Summary

Today Lloyd learned a regression line has adds little to no value to his visualization if it won’t help him predict pizza prices from the number of toppings ordered.

As the owner of a prestigious pizza joint, you realize the importance of visualizing both the scatterplot and the residual plot instead of flying blind with correlation, R-Squared, and p-values alone.

Understanding residuals is one key to determining the success of your regression model. When you decide to use a regression line, keep your ultimate business goals in mind – apply the model, check the residual plot, calculate specific residuals to judge prediction error. Use context to decide how much faith to place in the magical maths.

linear_regression cartoon

*Full list of assumptions to be checked for the use of linear regression and how to check them here.

Want to have your own least-squares fun? This Rossman-Chance applet provides hours of entertainment for your bivariate needs. 

—Anna Foard is a Business Development Consultant at Velocity Group

The Analytics PAIN: How to Interpret Trend Lines and Greek Letters

The Basics

Let’s say you own Pearson’s Pizza, a local pizza joint. You hire your nephew Lloyd to run the place, but you don’t exactly trust Lloyd’s math skills. So, to make it easier on the both of you, you price pizza at $15 and each topping at $1.

On a scatterplot you see a positive, linear pattern:

pizza1
Since the price of the pizza increases by $1 for each additional topping, that $1 per topping is quite literally the slope of the line of best fit.

Interpreting Software Output

Trend lines are used for prediction purposes (more on that later). In this example, you wouldn’t need a trend line to determine the cost of a pizza with, say, 10 toppings. But let’s say Lloyd needs some math help and you dabble in the black art of statistics.

Most software calculates this line of best fit using a method to minimize the squared vertical distances from the points to that line (called least-squares regression). In the pizza parlor example, little is needed to find the line of best fit since the points line up perfectly.

pizza3

The Equation of the Trend Line…

…may take you back to 9th grade Algebra

y = mx +b

Price = 1*NumberofToppings + 15

The price of the pizza (y) depends on the the number of toppings ordered (x). The independent (x) variable is always multiplied by the slope of the line. Here, the slope is $1. For every additional topping, the price of the pizza is predicted to increase by $1.

The price of the pizza without any toppings is $15. In the equation above, 15 is the y-intercept –The price of a cheese pizza, to be more specific to the example.

We’ll also refer to this equation as the “linear model.”

R and R-Squared (or, The Coefficients of Confusion)

The second value listed is called R-squared. But before you interpret R-squared (R^2) for Lloyd, you need to give him an idea of R since R-Squared is based on R.

R has many names: Pearson’s Coefficient, Pearson’s R, Pearson’s Product Moment, Correlation Coefficient

Why R? Pearson begins with a P…

No, Pearson wasn’t a Pirate. The Greek letter Ρ is called “Rho,” and translates to English as an “R”.

Pearson’s R measures correlation – the strength and direction of a linear relationship. Emphasis on LINEAR.

guideline-for-interpreting-correlation-coefficient-2-638

-From LinkedIn Learning 

Since R-Squared = 1, you’ve probably figured out R = √1, or ±1. Positive 1 here, since there is a positive association between number of toppings and price. There is a perfect positive correlation between the number of toppings ordered and the price of the pizza.

Since the price of pizza goes up as the number of toppings increases, the slope is positive and therefore the correlation coefficient is positive (there is a mathematical relationship between the two – not going to bore you with the calculations). It is interesting to note the calculation for correlation does not distinguish between independent and dependent variables — that means, mathematically, correlation does not imply causation*. 

The p-value of this output tells you the significance of the association between the two variables – specifically, the slope. Did the slope of 1 happen by chance? No, not at all. It’s significant because the two variables are associated in a perfectly linear pattern. This particular software gives “N/A” in this situation, but other software will give p < 0.000000. (P-values deserve their own blog post – no room here.)

R-Squared has another name: The coefficient of determination

Often you’ll hear R-Squared reported as a %. In this case, R-Squared = 100%. So why is R-Squared 100% here? Look at the graph – no points stray from the line! There is absolutely no variability (differences) whatsoever between the actual points and the linear model! Which makes it easy to understand the interpretation of R-Squared here:

100% of the variability (differences) in pizza prices can be explained by the different number of toppings.

Hearing this, you tell Lloyd that R-Squared tells us how useful this linear equation is for predicting pizza prices from number of toppings.

But in real life…R-Squared is NOT 100%.

Business Complications

Problem: Your customers start asking for “gourmet” toppings. And to profit, you’ll have to charge $1.50 for these gourmet toppings. You’ll still offer the $1 “regular” toppings as well.

Now, the relationship between a pizza’s price and number of toppings could vary substantially:

pizza4

Lloyd is gonna freak.

As the number of toppings increase, there is more and more dispersion of points along the line. That’s because the combination of regular and gourmet toppings differs more with as number of toppings increase.

Lloyd says a customer wants 4 toppings. He forgot to write down exactly which toppings. Four regular toppings will come to $19. But 4 gourmet toppings is a little pricier at $21. The prediction line says it’s $20. We’re only within a couple dollars, but that’s a good bit of variability. Over time, Pearson’s Pizza may lose money or piss off customers (losing more money) if Lloyd chooses the prediction line over getting the order right.

R-Squared (Again):

It’s all about VARIABILITY – the differences between the actual points and the line. And this is why predicting with a trend line is to be done with caution:

89.29% of the variability (differences) in pizza prices can be explained by the different number of toppings. Other reasons (like the type of topping chosen) cause the price differences, not just the number of toppings.

What R-Squared isn’t:

And that doesn’t mean the model will get it right 89.29% of the time (it’s not a probability). R-Squared also doesn’t tell us the percent of the points the line goes through (a common misunderstanding).

Non-linear Models – 3 Warnings

How does gas mileage change as your car speed increases?

Gas1

Even though we can see the points are not linear, let’s slap a trend line on there to make certain, for LOLs:

Gas2

Hint: Horizontal trend lines tell you NOTHING. If slope = 0, R = 0.

And now you also understand why the R-squared value is equal to 0:

0% of the variability in gas mileage can be explained by the change in speed of the vehicle.

Wait a second…

CLEARLY there is a relationship! AKA, Why we visualize our data and don’t trust the the naked stats.

Mathematically, the trick is to “transform” the curve into a line to find the appropriate model. It typically involves logarithms, square roots, or the reciprocal of a predictor variable.

kevin hart

I won’t do that here.

 

Gas3

As you can see, technology is amazing and created this model from a 3rd degree polynomial…

Warning #1

Which is TOTALLY FINE if you’re going to interpolate – predict for mileage only between the speeds of 20 and 60 mph. In case you are wondering why you wouldn’t extrapolate – predict for speeds outside the 20 – 60 mph range, I brought in a special guest.

bill nye

 

Third degree polynomials have 2 turns:

 

Gas5
The full gas mileage vs. speed model. This is not the model you thought you were dating.

The R-Squared value here is 0.9920 – this value is based on the transformed data (when the software temporarily made it linear behind your back). Remember the part about R (and therefore R-Squared) describing only LINEAR models? The R-Squared is still helpful in determining a model fit, but context changes a bit to reflect the mathematical operations used to make the fit. So use R-Squared as a guide, but the interpretation isn’t going to make sense in the context of the original variables anymore. Though no need to worry about all that if you stick to interpolation!

Warnings #2 and #3

What if my software uses nonlinear regression?

This can get confusing so I’ll keep it brief. Full disclosure: I thought nonlinear regression and curve-fitting with linear regression yielded the same interpretation until Ben Jones pointed out my mistake!

R-Squared does NOT make sense for nonlinear regression. R-Squared is mathematically inaccurate for nonlinear models and can lead to erroneous conclusions. Many statistical software packages won’t include R-Squared for nonlinear models – please ignore it if your software kicks it out to you.

Consequently, ignore the p-value for nonlinear regression models as well – the p-value is based on an association using Pearson’s R, which is robust for linear relationships only.

The explanation of warnings 2 and 3 are beyond the scope of this post – but if you’d like to learn more about the “why,” let me know!

Thanks for sticking around until the end. Send me a message if you have a suggestion for the next topic!

*Even though number of toppings does cause the price to increase in this use case, we cannot apply that logic to correlation universally. Since correlation does not differentiate between the independent and dependent variables, the correlation value itself could erroneously suggest pizza prices cause the number of toppings to increase.

Bonus Resource: An excellent video I found explaining R-squared using a similar pizza example! If what I said still leaves you confused, Mr. Nystrom will certainly give you pizza mind! 

—Anna Foard is a Business Development Consultant at Velocity Group

Using Tableau to Improve Individual Student Learning

Fact: Educators must use student data to increase student learning.

Fact: Educators must produce data evidence that they did, in fact, attempt to increase student learning.

Fact: Educators compare class averages (means) on summative assessments to determine test reliability and student learning.

Fact: Test validity is rarely discussed.

Fact: Most data sets (class size) are small sample sizes with huge variations in classroom demographics between classes (even period to period with the same teacher)

This article is dated; however, these are present and real problems within school districts.

As you know, adults are resistant to change. Teachers are asked to produce data but given minimal training outside of “compare average test scores”. And without a math background, this may even make sense to those educators and superintendents. Therefore, when it’s easier to compare a mean and it cleans up the mandatory paperwork faster, this is the way things are done.
Question: How will (only) comparing averaging actually help individual student learning?
Question: If teachers lack a background of statistics and, even more frustrating for the educator, lack the time to learn the basics, how will they begin to leverage their own student data to improve learning? Ultimately, it is what they WANT to do. But how?
Solution: Educators need to answer deeper questions about their students using data without additional statistical training all while using their time efficiently. It must also be priced for teachers: free. And it’s here. It’s called Tableau. It’s data visualization. Instead of looking at a sea of numbers, Tableau produces pictures. Without a math background, anyone can look for trends and draw conclusions. And it’s free to educators.
 Data 4
Tableau allows teachers to import student gradebook data (most gradebooks export as a .CSV). Once the educator is in the Tableau workbook, one can merely hold down the CTRL key, click on whatever variables they would like to compare/explore. A “show me” set of suggested graphs pops up (if it doesn’t automatically pop up, after taking fingers off the keyboard, CTRL+1 will do the trick). You can also just drag and drop into the workbook. Drag and drop students to color. Play with it. And sometimes an ID will need to be set to a string (so the software knows you’re talking people, not calculations) and sometimes you’ll need to switch columns and rows for a better visual. I recommend sorting students by whatever measure (assessment? assignment? overall grade?) you are asking your data to compare. Playing with the visualization is a fun way of learning how to use the software. It won’t take long.
My first visualization
Unit 3 Tableau
Only a subset of the full visualization for 63 students. The bars show the student’s overall AP Stats performance through this unit.
This graphic sorts messy data from Unit 3 (The Linear Regression unit) into a clean, organized dashboard to help me compare my students’ formative and summative assessments (sorted on Unit Test score, ascending).
I was shocked to see the overall trend in the formative to summative scores: They went DOWN. And they shouldn’t. And that’s a validity problem from my end. But this was not so evident in looking at the aggregate data. A t-test would tell me there is “no significant difference” between quiz and test scores. But we’re talking individuals, my students. And my job is to GROW them. By looking within the data, I found trends about which types of students, for example, lost traction from quiz to test. And my ultimate conclusion was to take ownership on my end. (This could be another post for another day.)
After playing with Tableau some more, I realized rows worked better than columns for the above visualization.
And did you know that approximately 8 percent of men and 0.5 percent of women are red/green colorblind?
So my next 2 units looked more like this:
Unit 5 Tableau
To support our school’s mission and vision, I began teaching other teachers how to leverage student data within their PLCs to draw meaningful conclusions about teacher methods and student learning with Tableau. And these teachers are excited to identify trends and answer deeper student needs questions – to ultimately help and grow each individual student.
It is time teachers stop looking only to aggregate data and averages. We need the tools to find trends within each student’s learning patterns in order to provide them with the best “differentiated” learning experience for them. Unfortunately, I have found there is a huge gap between what districts want and what teachers are asked to do.
Some school districts have already figured this out. – Yes, that includes Atlanta Public Schools. Teachers have access to their student data through dashboards with a click of a button. And not only do they use it, they find value in the data visualization.
Eventually, data dashboards that ultimately give teachers a visualization of their current student data, including growth and achievement data, is the future of education. Right now teachers who want this will have to figure out the software (thankfully, Tableau is easy to use for simple visualizations.) But ultimately, data visualization through dashboards are the next step in the journey.
The beginnings of my data dashboard:
data 1
data 2
data 3

Draw a Picture? (or, Check out this data on metal bands)

What is the first thing you should do when you encounter a mess of data?this is legit.

Draw a….what? (It’s in your notes…)

Draw a PICTURE. A distribution. A graph.
LOOK AT IT.

But statistics doesn’t just revolve around histograms, boxplots and scatterplots. Statisticians have (marginally) grown personalities over the years and realize non-statisticians need something tangible to understand data trends. Enter: Nathan Yau of FlowingData.com, a PhD candidate in statistics who makes use of his background in computer science to explore and visualize data.

Since the word “data” sounds so dull…like “widgets” in economics…let’s look at a few examples Yau took from reality:

Evidence of “data-visualization” tools is very commonplace these days and you’ll find that many popular websites mix humor and/or pop-culture into their infographics (The Onion has been doing it for years). 

More:
Time Travel in Popular Film and TV
Movie Monster Comparison Chart

OR Make your own at Graphjam.com